Media Intelligence: Heard on the Web

Submitted by: Phil Riebel 09/14/2012

"He went on to say that print isn't dead, it is evolving, and we had best reinterpret its role in our lives as publishers. I was fascinated by the comment that we are in an information overload era and just because more information is available to us doesn't mean we have any more time to consume it."


September 12 2012

by Bo Sacks, BoSacks Blog

This week I am in Phoenix, Arizona at the Idealliance Spectrum conference.  Today's opening keynote session was by my good friend Drew Davis.  I have seen Drew thrill audiences at least half a dozen times and each time there are more and more fascinating takeaways for any publishing professional. Just watching him is an exhausting experience. He jokes about drinking 26 Dr. Peppers before coming on stage. I am only guessing that he doesn't actually drink all that caffeine before performing, but I don't have another answer for all the demonstrated and exuberant energy.   
  
Drew's topic for our analysis today was called "The Future of Digital Is Print." He made a compelling case for all of us to consider digital content repurposed in print formats.  He explained that print content has an extended life span, while digital doesn't and is temporary at best. 
  
He had a humorous discussion on the theory that if he had a nickel for every time he heard that "print is dead" he would be rich.  However, under his close analysis, it turns out that this theory doesn't work out to be a lucrative way to make living. 
  
He went on to say that print isn't dead, it is evolving, and we had best reinterpret its role in our lives as publishers.  I was fascinated by the comment that we are in an information overload era and just because more information is available to us doesn't mean we have any more time to consume it.  One of his conclusions was that the only thing that differentiates us in the digital world is a superior print product. Those are worthy ideas for any publisher to ponder.   
  
On Wednesday I will be giving the closing keynote address and will analyze the highlights and takeaways from this Spectrum conference.  I will be framing what I heard and coordinating it with an analysis of the past, present and future of publishing. 
  
"Future. That period of time in which our affairs prosper, our friends are true and our happiness is assured." - Ambrose Bierce